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August 23, 2017 | Nonfiction

Seven Mournings

Alysia Sawchyn

It is not the anniversary of her death that wrecks me but a day some weeks before it. It is the anniversary of the day I sat on my porch, barefoot, polyester graduation trappings in hand, and thought to call her but then did not because I was too busy. 

Seven Mournings photo
Three Poems photo

August 22, 2017 | Poetry

Three Poems

Jen Town

Lyrical lines of color dripping down: a chemical skyline.

A Heart and a Half photo

August 21, 2017 | Fiction

A Heart and a Half

Gary Joshua Garrison

Out by the park, I say, I’ve got your blood in me, and you look at me funny, like you are waiting for this to be another mediocre joke, and it is, somehow, but I don’t know the punchline yet. 

Love Story in the Form of a Taco photo

August 18, 2017 | Fiction

Love Story in the Form of a Taco

Daniel Paul

“Isn’t there something called ‘Pizza’?” I whispered to my girlfriend one night, awake from a dream; she kissed my forehead, her breath heavy with the sweet smell of cilantro, and sent me back to sleep.

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